Indigenous people win historic victory in Brazil – University of Copenhagen

09 September 2016

Indigenous people win historic victory in Brazil

This news is redirected by The Secretariat for Development Cooperation at SCIENCE from the World's Best News.

As part of The World's Best News campaign, development.ku.dk is posting a series of articles on the positive sides of Danish development aid. The original article is in Danish.

The indigenous Munduruku people in Brazil have win a historicly great victory against the construction of a large embankment project in the heart of the Amazon.

Greenpeace

While the world's attention is directed towards the Olympic Games in Rio the cheers have broken out in the heart of the Amazon where the indigenous Munduruku people have won a historic battle in favour of their country.

Brazil's federal environmental agency has announced that they will not provide the necessary environmental permits for the contriction of the so-called Sao Luiz do Tapajós embankment in the middle of the Amazon rainforest.

The Tapajó embankment was set to become the sixth largest embankment in the world and would cause the flooding of 400 square kilometers of rainforest where approximately 12.000 Munduruku indians resides.

The Munduruku people have for more than 30 years fought against the construction of the large embankment project in the heart of the Amazon rainforest.

The decision also arouses joy with Greenpeace who has helped the Munduruku people in their battle against the embankment project.

"This is really good news for the rainforest, and for the people who has the rainforest as their basis for living, but it is also good news for the climate, since hydroelectric powerstations in vulnerable ecosystems such as the Amazon is a really bad energy solution. Floodings cause the destruction of huge rainforest areas, and that leads to great greenhouse gas emissions to the atmosphere," Julie Koch, head of the campaign in Greenpeace Denmark, says.

This year the Munduruku people has begun mapping the areas where they live in the efforts to obtain the recognition of their ownership of the area.